Dirty Kitchen Girl

Inspired by my rural upbringing in Australia and my travels to the Philippine Islands; these experiences have cultivated into this colourful journal of delicious stories and recipes.
An Australian girl, living between Adelaide and Manila.
UBE LAMINGTONS FOR AUSTRALIA DAY 

I have been thinking about creating this recipe for such a long time, but held out especially for Australia Day. As an Australian married to a Filipino I have had my fair share of Filipino merienda and desserts, but little is known about our Australian food culture across the world. 

Lamingtons are bite sized cakes dipped in chocolate and shredded coconut that are sold in bakeries, a staple at kids parties and are represent Australia Day celebrations across the country. It is still widely disputed by historians as to whom actually created them in the kitchen of Lord Lamington, the Governor of Queensland in Brisbane over 100 years ago.

To celebrate my Filipino- Australian family I have turned this Australian Classic into an Australian Merienda using coconut flour and Ube Halaya for the topping. 

Unfortunately I have been unable to source freshly grown purple yam in my town, so I used frozen grated purple yam from our asian grocery that is exported from the Philippines. I advocate using fresh if possible, never substitute for fresh produce if your able to. 

Makes 25For the cake
6 fresh eggs ( I used fresh from our hens) 
2 tablespoons of raw coconut sugar
1 tablespoon of vanilla essence, extract or paste
1/2 cup of coconut flour 
1/4 cup of butter or macadamia oil
2 teaspoons of baking flour ( gluten free) 
1-2 cups of shredded coconut 
For the Ube Halaya 
*Prepare the Ube Halaya the night before
500 grams of fresh grated uncooked purple yam 
1/2 can of coconut milk 
1 tablespoon of coconut sugar 
1/4 cup of butter 
Melt butter, add coconut milk and bring to the boil

Add the coconut sugar, stirring well

Lower the heat and add the purple yam until mixed in well

Stir for about 15-20 minutes until the purple yam is thick

Cover and put in the fridge overnight

Preheat the oven to 320f/160c 

Prepare a square baking tin, liming it with baking paper 

Whisk eggs for 10 minutes, add coconut sugar and vanilla extract together well. It is important that the eggs are beaten well to ensure the cake is light and fluffy 

Scoop in the butter or macadamia oil and mix together 

Add the coconut flour and baking powder and mix well, making sure there are no lumps

Bake in the oven for 35 minutes, or until firm on the top Let the cake cool down for 20 minutes on a cake rack 

Using a knife, cut the cake into square of rectangular pieces. I prefer to make mine into smaller bite sized pieces. But traditionally they are much larger

Lightly Shave the edges off each side of the squares using a knife so the ube will stick 

One by one, spread each side with enough Ube Halaya to cover without the cake showing through, it will get sticky but the shredded coconut will keep it in place

Roll each one in shredded coconut and place on the tray in the fridge until set

 * Keep them in an airtight container so they remain moist and consume within a few days. 
- Eve

UBE LAMINGTONS FOR AUSTRALIA DAY

I have been thinking about creating this recipe for such a long time, but held out especially for Australia Day. As an Australian married to a Filipino I have had my fair share of Filipino merienda and desserts, but little is known about our Australian food culture across the world.

Lamingtons are bite sized cakes dipped in chocolate and shredded coconut that are sold in bakeries, a staple at kids parties and are represent Australia Day celebrations across the country. It is still widely disputed by historians as to whom actually created them in the kitchen of Lord Lamington, the Governor of Queensland in Brisbane over 100 years ago.

To celebrate my Filipino- Australian family I have turned this Australian Classic into an Australian Merienda using coconut flour and Ube Halaya for the topping. Unfortunately I have been unable to source freshly grown purple yam in my town, so I used frozen grated purple yam from our asian grocery that is exported from the Philippines. I advocate using fresh if possible, never substitute for fresh produce if your able to.

Makes 25

For the cake
6 fresh eggs ( I used fresh from our hens)
2 tablespoons of raw coconut sugar
1 tablespoon of vanilla essence, extract or paste
1/2 cup of coconut flour
1/4 cup of butter or macadamia oil
2 teaspoons of baking flour ( gluten free)
1-2 cups of shredded coconut

For the Ube Halaya
*Prepare the Ube Halaya the night before
500 grams of fresh grated uncooked purple yam
1/2 can of coconut milk
1 tablespoon of coconut sugar
1/4 cup of butter

Melt butter, add coconut milk and bring to the boil

Add the coconut sugar, stirring well

Lower the heat and add the purple yam until mixed in well

Stir for about 15-20 minutes until the purple yam is thick

Cover and put in the fridge overnight

Preheat the oven to 320f/160c

Prepare a square baking tin, liming it with baking paper

Whisk eggs for 10 minutes, add coconut sugar and vanilla extract together well. It is important that the eggs are beaten well to ensure the cake is light and fluffy

Scoop in the butter or macadamia oil and mix together

Add the coconut flour and baking powder and mix well, making sure there are no lumps

Bake in the oven for 35 minutes, or until firm on the top Let the cake cool down for 20 minutes on a cake rack

Using a knife, cut the cake into square of rectangular pieces. I prefer to make mine into smaller bite sized pieces. But traditionally they are much larger

Lightly Shave the edges off each side of the squares using a knife so the ube will stick

One by one, spread each side with enough Ube Halaya to cover without the cake showing through, it will get sticky but the shredded coconut will keep it in place

Roll each one in shredded coconut and place on the tray in the fridge until set

* Keep them in an airtight container so they remain moist and consume within a few days.
- Eve

LAMB AND MINT EMPANADAS

There’s something about mint, it is definitely one of my favourite herbs. I love mint ice cream, mojitos, peppermint chocolate, mint tea, did I mention mojitos? Anything with fresh mint is always good.

My mint is growing really well considering the recent heatwave in Adelaide. Freshly picked and made into a mint sauce it was perfect for making Empanadas with the left over lamb from last nights roast.

To conform to my annoying allergies, I made gluten free Empanadas first and they tasted delish straight out of the oven…. But after 10 minutes they turned into rock. I will have to keep practicing using various non-wheat flours until I come up with a brilliant one to share with my fellow gastronomically crippled friends.

To compensate for this disaster I quickly made up a batch for my husband using wheat flour and the remaining filling.
Makes 12-14

For the dough
3 cups flour
250 grams of butter (ice cold)
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons sugar
1/2 cup ice cold water
1 Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar

For the filling
Lamb chopped finely (pan fried is also fine). The quantity doesn’t matter you can always freeze and make them again. You may choose to use more or less meat. its completely up to you.
1 potato diced finely
1 carrot diced finely
1 cup of raisins or sultanas
1/4 cup of mint sauce

For the glaze
1 egg ,1/4 milk and a dash of salt in a separate dish

For the mint sauce
I used Jaime Oliver’s Mint Sauce recipe. Mix all of the ingredients.
4 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
1 teaspoon sugar
2 pinches salt
1 tablespoon hot water
3 tablespoons wine vinegar

Prepare dough by adding flour, sugar and butter working the mixture in gently until it is a crumb like consistency. The butter should be rock hard and cold.

Make a well in the middle of the mixture, add the apple cider vinegar, then add the water working it into the mixture until it becomes smooth but firm. Don’t over knead the mixture.
Take a small amount of your mixture and roll into a ball. If it is firm and easy to roll it is ready. If it cracks and breaks apart, it may need more water. You can add a little water a teaspoon at a time until it is easier to mould.
Wrap dough in cling wrap and place in the refrigerator for a few hours.

Sautee vegetables in mince sauce and butter until soft. Add shredded lamb and raisins. Mix in well until warm and turn off heat. Stir through the mint sauce.

Using two pieces of baking paper, roll out dough between each piece until it is 1/2 a cm thick.The baking sheets will prevent the dough from getting stuck on the rolling pin and your surface.

Use a cookie cutter 10cm in width to cut out your circles. I used a tart mould to get my fancy edges. You can also crimp the edges with a fork.

Spoon in a tablespoon of your filling into the middle of the circles and fold over into a half moon shape and press down sealing the mixture in.

Place empanadas on a tray lined with baking paper

Glaze with egg mixture and place in the oven at 180 degrees for 25 minutes or until golden brown.
***NON-GF
PORT LINCOLN MUSSEL AND SEAFOOD KARE-KARE

Today I spotted these gorgeous black mussels at the farmers market and knew it was time to step it up a notch and make a Filipino classic with the flavours from our local Australian waters. My husband and I fought over cooking this one, in the end we cooked it together arguing passionately over adding olives. He won. How dare I suggest adding olives?!  

Port Lincoln on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia is renowned for producing some of the world’s best seafood and also known for it’s White Pointer Sharks. Do you remember the movie Jaws? A little movie trivia for you, Part II was shot in Port Lincoln. 

Mussels being high in selenium and protein, zinc and vitamin c pack a punch of nutrition and taste that works so well with the richness of the peanut butter. This is a quick dish that is perfect on a cooler day that you will crave again and again. 

Serves 41 kilo fresh mussels
Half a kilo of your favourite fishmongers marinara mix 
1 eggplant diced 
1 onion finely chopped 
1 bunch of string beans
1 bunch of bok choy 
1 Jar of peanut butter 
Salt and pepper 
2 Tablespoons of rice flour 
Tablespoon of butter 

Boil mussels in a medium pot with shallow water until the shells open, remove mussels and put aside in a colander

Keep stock from mussels as the base

Add onion and seafood marinara to the water and bring to the boil

Remove seafood and onion and put aside, leaving the pot of stock

Add 1 jar of peanut butter to the stock and dissolve 

Blanch beans and bok choy and put aside

Sautee eggplant with butter and put aside

Use the onion from the stock and sautee with garlic in a large pot

Add a pinch of salt and pepper

Add the seafood and sautee for a few minutes

Add stock and mix all of the vegetables in

Add 2 Tablespoons of rice flour to thicken

Simmer for 5 minutes

**Best eaten on a bed of steamed rice. I like to drown my rice with Kare-Kare. The soupier, the better!

PORT LINCOLN MUSSEL AND SEAFOOD KARE-KARE

Today I spotted these gorgeous black mussels at the farmers market and knew it was time to step it up a notch and make a Filipino classic with the flavours from our local Australian waters. My husband and I fought over cooking this one, in the end we cooked it together arguing passionately over adding olives. He won. How dare I suggest adding olives?!

Port Lincoln on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia is renowned for producing some of the world’s best seafood and also known for it’s White Pointer Sharks. Do you remember the movie Jaws? A little movie trivia for you, Part II was shot in Port Lincoln.

Mussels being high in selenium and protein, zinc and vitamin c pack a punch of nutrition and taste that works so well with the richness of the peanut butter. This is a quick dish that is perfect on a cooler day that you will crave again and again.

Serves 4
1 kilo fresh mussels
Half a kilo of your favourite fishmongers marinara mix
1 eggplant diced
1 onion finely chopped
1 bunch of string beans
1 bunch of bok choy
1 Jar of peanut butter
Salt and pepper
2 Tablespoons of rice flour
Tablespoon of butter

Boil mussels in a medium pot with shallow water until the shells open, remove mussels and put aside in a colander

Keep stock from mussels as the base

Add onion and seafood marinara to the water and bring to the boil

Remove seafood and onion and put aside, leaving the pot of stock

Add 1 jar of peanut butter to the stock and dissolve

Blanch beans and bok choy and put aside

Sautee eggplant with butter and put aside

Use the onion from the stock and sautee with garlic in a large pot

Add a pinch of salt and pepper

Add the seafood and sautee for a few minutes

Add stock and mix all of the vegetables in

Add 2 Tablespoons of rice flour to thicken

Simmer for 5 minutes

**Best eaten on a bed of steamed rice. I like to drown my rice with Kare-Kare. The soupier, the better!